Archive for the ‘Research’ Category

TACCLE 3: CODING

Thursday, August 13th, 2015

EU_flag-Erasmus+

TACCLE 3 Coding is a new research project which looks at Teachers’ Aids on Creating Content for Learning Environments in the field of coding. It is funded (from 9/2015 to 8/2017) under the European Commission’s Erasmus+ program, key action: Cooperation for innovation and the exchange of good practices.

TACCLE 3 coding aims to encourage and support teachers to introduce coding, programming and/or computational thinking as part of the curriculum in the 4 – 14 classroom to better equip pupils to develop the skills needed by the European labour market. It will broaden teachers’ digital skills base and enhance their professional competence and show how entrepreneurial skills can be developed and integrated with programming skills. The project will also stimulate a positive attitude towards STEM with young children.

In the framework of the project, KIT will look at more playful, visual and arts-based models and approaches to teaching and learning about computational modeling and thinking by bridging technology, art and creative design processes, maker and DiY cultures.

The project’s aims are:

• To encourage and support teachers to introduce coding, programming and / or computational thinking as part of the curriculum in the 4 – 14 classroom to better equip pupils to develop the skills needed by the European labor market.
• To broaden teachers’ digital skills base and enhance their professional competence
• To show how entrepreneurial skills can be developed and integrated with programming skills The project objectives are:
• To produce an on-line support package of ideas, activities, materials and downloadable resources for teachers who are teaching coding or programming or who want to.
• To provide CPD courses in a variety of formats and a template and materials for local delivery.
• To establish a dialogue between teachers and programmers, teachers and resource producers, teachers and organizations involved in teaching coding and to act as an agency for exchanges of curricula, ideas and practice.

The demand for ICT professionals continues to grow. The European Commission estimates there will be 700, 000 unfilled vacancies for ICT practitioners in the EU by the year 2016. Of all job vacancies in ICT, computer programmers are the most in demand outnumbering the demand for other IT professionals by a factor of 5 to 1. The greatest demand is in UK, Germany, Estonia and other Northern European countries, which reflects the make up of the project partnership.

Despite this skills shortage, there has been limited response from the European education system. Estonia has already introduced computer programming for all ages across the school curriculum, Denmark partially so. Others are about to introduce it (such as England in 2014) and others are considering it (e.g. Finland, Ireland). Some German Länder such as Bavaria are well advanced; others are not. In other countries, whilst not part of the compulsory curriculum, there are agencies and individual teachers who are trying to introduce programming into the classroom. What seems inevitable is that all member states must surely move in this direction if they are to meet the skills demands of the European economy. The biggest problem we face is a desperate shortage of teachers. Mathematics and computer-science graduates generally choose more lucrative trades; the humanities and social-science graduates who will find themselves teaching coding will need plenty of support as will the primary teachers. In addition the OECD reports that more and more computer programmers prefer to be self-employed or working in micro-SME partnerships and not committed to one particular long-term employer and the vacancy market is beginning to reflect the increase in a new form of employment in the ICT sector. For this reason the project is looking to produce resources for developing entrepreneurship skills alongside programming skills.

The project will:

· Develop a website of activities and ideas that teachers can use in the classroom to teach children about coding and programming. These will support diverse curricula across member states and, where there is no formal curriculum, support individual schools and teachers who want to introduce computing / informatics / programming etc. in their own practice
· Develop some affordable resource kits that can be downloaded or for which instructions for making them can be provided on-line. This could result in selling the resource kits after the project as part of the exploitation and sustainability.
· Design and pilot some staff development opportunities and learning resources for teachers who are total newcomers to programming.
· Stimulate a positive attitude towards STEM with young children
· Test and evaluate existing resources such as the range of software currently available to help children develop programming skills.
· Explore and follow up existing research and projects addressing this issue (e.g. work on Tangible User Interface for children.)
· Enter into policy dialogue and inform policy in countries around issues concerning the teaching and learning of programming in schools” (source: project proposal).

Co-ordinator: Jens Vermeersch, adjunct van de directeur, GO! Onderwijs van de Vlaamse Gemeenschap, afdeling Beleid & Strategie, Internationalisation, Brussels

Project partners:
IBP/KIT, Germany
Pontydysgu, Wales, U.K.,
SGR Antigon Schoöengroep 1, Antwerpen, Belgium
HITSA HariDUE INFOTHHNOLOGIA SIHTASUTUS, Research centre, Tallinn, Estonia
TALLINN University, Tallinn, Estonia
UNIVERSiDAD DE SALAMANCA, Spain
AALTO UNIVERSITY, Helsinki, Finland
University of Eastern Finland, School of Computing, KUOPIO, Finland

Vocational biography design to support young unemployed people goes Europe

Sunday, November 2nd, 2014

We just managed to transfer the idea of enabling young unemployed people to visualize their vocational experience and biography using digital media to the European level. The research project “Show Your Own Gold (Acronym) develops, tests and evaluates „a European Concept to Visualize and Reflect One’s Vocational Biography Using Digital Media”. It is funded under the ERASMUS+ Key Action 2, Strategic Partnerships programm for 3 years (2014-2017), co-ordinated by IBP/KIT

EU_flag-Erasmus+

Aims and objectives
The project aims to develop a European concept for consultancy, including course design, to enable young, unemployed people to display their vocational biography. This is realized by producing media available on a multimedia-based online environment to visualise informally and formally acquired skills. The letter is realized by introducing media-based competence portfolios. Within the framework of the project, both the Internet-based competence portfolio as well as consultancy offered for the participants of vocational preparation courses will be developed in the form of an scientifically accompanied course. The course will be developed, realized with young people in the 6 countries and evaluated.
The concept refers to research undertaken in the MediaArt@Edu (BMBF) as well as in the AIKO projects.

Project partners:
• Instituto Politécnico de Beja, Art and Multimedia Laboratory, Education Faculty, Beja, Portugal (Prof. Dr. Aldo Passarinho, Prof. Ana Sofia Velhinhu Sousa), Website

• PONTYDYSGU LTD, The Bridge To Learning, Wales, U.K. (director: Graham Attwell) Website

• SC AxA Consulting 99 SRL, a consultancy and training company providing high quality skills training programmes for corporate and industrial clients. (Liliana Voicu), Bucarest, Romania, Website

• UNIVERSITAT DE BARCELONA, Cultural Pedagogies, Faculty of Fine Arts, Esbrina Research Group – Subjectivitats i Entorns Educatius Contemporan“, dedicated to the study of the conditions and current changes in education in a world mediated by digital technologies and visual culture. (Prof. Dr. Fernando Hernández-Hernández, Prof. Dr. Juana M Sancho-Gill, Rachel Fendler), Website

• Zavod NEFIKS Institut za promocijo in belezenje neformalno pridobljenega znanja/ aims to educate young people in different fields, persuading employers to consider non-formal education as a reference when getting a job.
Ljubljana, Slovenia (Alenka Blazinšek) Website

• Co-ordinator: Institute of Vocational and General Education at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology KIT (Dr. Daniela Reimann, Prof. Dr. Martin Fischer, M.A. Kerstin Huber, M.A. Kristina Stoewe, Nadine Görg)

Summary
The project intends to make young unemployed people set up, reflect and visualize their individual vocational and educational biography, actively producing media available on a Web-based multimedia environment. Formally and informally acquired skills and competencies are visualized using a particular type of online portfolio developed in the project (by the partner PONTYDYSGU LTD). Within the framework of the project, both the Web-based multimedia environment as well as the consultancy of young people will be developed in the form of an accompanying course offered in each of the participating countries.

In the project, a consultancy concept with a specific scope of courses offered for the generation and reflection of appropriate media formats, such as video clips showing the young participants at the workplace, in work processes, at the company, during internships. Further interviews with the trainees and skilled workers of a branch, including images of their own work pieces and projects are to be provided.

The research design is based on several distinct research strategies:

1. A desk study (analysis, literature review) of the situation of vocational preparation organised and embedded in the VET system and the employment situation of young people in the partner countries. This is necessary in that no studies are at present available on the analysis of the integration of the concept of vocational biography design in vocational preparation in the participating countries;
2. The development of the course (curriculum design) and
3. Its’ application in vocational preparation, followed by
4. a set of in-depth group interviews and surveys with the social actors involved, such as trainees and trainers, accompanied by a series of transnational work meetings.

Dissemination
The results of the project will be clearly spelled out to be easily circulated and disseminated via an International Youth Panel, including the BIBB the German Federal Institute of Vocational Education and Training, as well as social media in order to enhance their usability within the policy making process. The project aims to support EU and national policy makers for what concerns the development & implementation of new VET related policies towards a European concept of successful vocational biography design.

The interim project Web site can be accessed here

EU_flag-Erasmus+

Art and Robotics Workshop at IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation Karlsruhe ICRA 13

Thursday, May 9th, 2013

ICRA 13 LOGO

art and robotics

Just a quick announcement – currently the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation ICRA 2013, organised by the Institute for Anthropomatics at KIT, takes place in Karlsruhe, Germany. On May 10 a full day workshop on Art and Robotics: Freud’s Unheimlich and the Uncanny Valley will be held at the Kongresszentrum. See here for the programme, the list of speakers can be accessed here.

The Web stream of the main conference be accessed here.

ICRA13

photos/source via ICRA Website at ira13.org and http://uncannyvalley_icra2013.sssup.it/index.html

International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies (IJACDT)

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011

LOGO IJACDT

For those of you interested in smart textile and low cost wearables as an artistic context to engage young women in technology and engineering in education, feel free to check the International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies (IJACDT), ISSUE ON CREATIVITY, INNOVATION AND TECHNOLOGIES CULTURES edited by Gianluca Mura (2011), p. 12-21. You can access the abstract here, or view a sample PDF here. The Guest Editorial Preface by Gianluca Mura, Politecnico di Milano University, Italy can be accessed here. You might as well like to refer the Journal (IJACDT) to a Librarian via this link.

The International Journal of Art, Culture and Design Technologies (IJACDT) links art, design, science, and culture with emerging technologies. IJACDT provides a forum for exchanging ideas and findings from researchers across the design, arts, and technology disciplines. This journal covers theoretical and practice experiences among industrial design fields, architecture, art, computer science, psychology, cognitive sciences, humanities, cultural heritage, and related fields. IJACDT presents different arguments within project culture from the historical, critical, philosophical, rhetorical, creative, pedagogic, and professional points of view.”

LOGO IJACDT

ART AND TECHNOSCIENCE – Practices in transformation conference

Monday, February 22nd, 2010

Since I am interested in creativity, innovation, and education through the arts, my research looks at coupling arts, sciences, engineering and technology in trans-disciplinary education. ART&SCIENCE is an approach discussed in the LEONARDO community in terms of new curricula as well as new study programs in practice at university level.
The Artists-in-Labs-project initiated by Jill Scott brings together artists and scientists and aims to verify “the need for the arts and the sciences to work together in order to develop more creative and conceptual approaches to innovation and presentation.” (Scott, 2006).

However, in the context of arts&science and technology, I ran across the below conference entitled “ART AND TECHNOSCIENCE – Practices in transformation”. It is a conference organized by the Academy of Fine Arts in Finland, in collaboration with the Finnish Bioart Society and Pixelache festival, to take place over 24-25.3.2010 in Helsinki:

“The beginning of the 21st century is characterized by an overwhelming awareness of environmental issues. Facing the threat of global warming, the findings of scientific research have become a subject of intensive political debate. The ethical questions traditionally discussed in the green-wing marginals have become mainstream, as science has become a coffee-table topic.

The field of art that interacts with the practices of science and its technologies is commonly referred to as ART&SCIENCE. During the past decades, this hybrid field has become more or less established, with landmark works, major institutions and written histories. However, with the new wave of environmentalism, a further wave of artists working with methods and questions related to scientific research has also emerged.

The conference seeks to contextualize the practices of ART&SCIENCE both in the contemporary political atmosphere and the history of contemporary art.

The first day of the two-day conference focuses on the practices in transformation as a result of research-orientation and cross-disciplinarity, characteristic to the field of ART&SCIENCE.

The second day of the conference looks at the technologies of encounter between human and non-human worlds. The aim is to address the ethical discourse taking place in art practices which look at the interaction between humans and non-humans.

Speakers include Roy Ascott (artist, researcher, UK), Jill Scott (artist, researcher, AUS/CH), Andy Gracie (artist, UK/ESP), Ingeborg Reichle (art historian, DE), Adam Zaretsky (artist, US), Tuija Kokkonen (theatre director, FI), Terike Haapoja (artist, FI), Pau Alsina (researcher, ESP), Ulla Taipale (curator, FI/ESP), Anu Osva (artist, FI), Erich Berger (artist, coordinator ArsBioarctica, AUT/FI), Leena Valkeapää (artist, FI), Laura Beloff (artist, researcher, FI), Manu Tamminen (microbiologist, FI), Eija Juurola (forest researcher, FI), Raitis Smits (artist, curator, LV), Jan Kaila (artist, professor, FI), Antti Sajantila (professor, medical doctor, FI), Minna Långström (artist, FI), among others.”

Contact:
Erich Berger
Coordinator ArsBioarctica
eb@randomseed.org
+358-50-4338898
http://kilpiscope.net

Terike Haapoja
Artist, Phd researcher
mail@terikehaapoja.net
+358-50-4058341
http://kuva.fi

via sprectre

Symposium “Claiming Creativity: Art Education in Cultural Transition”

Saturday, December 26th, 2009

Colum.edu LOGO

elia-artschools LOGO

Since I work at the intersection of arts, design, computer science and media technology, am following the increasing interest in trans-disciplinary approaches being embraced by the research community in the field of arts, science and technology. As I addressed in earlier posts, there is an increasing interest of introducing the art practice based PhD in the framework of new study programs at art academics at the international level. However, one example of current trans-disciplinary research conferences I came across is the symposium entitled Claiming Creativity: Art Education in Cultural Transition presented by the Columbia College Chicago in partnership with The European League of Institutes of the Arts.

Interestingly the symposium includes a program strand on Arts, Science and Technologywhich outlines the following questions:

“-What are disciplines?
– What is between the disciplines?
– What is beyond the disciplines?
– Is art a discipline?
– Can disciplines talk to each other?
– Is technology a medium?
– How active is technological interactivity?
– How creative is science?
– Will the hype for social networking tip over into a desire for much more intimacy and privacy?
– Who is still interested in the millions of pictures of ‘my’ dog with a bent ear?”

What do you think about the questions? Are those the ones of most importance when looking at future education and development?

In the Leonardo Education Forum community, there is big debate on the issue of Arts&Science, especially addressing the impact of nano technology on the arts as well as nano arts.
However, the symposium is outlined as follows:

“Claiming Creativity seeks to re-position creativity as a driver not only for our economies, but also for art making, for transformational processes, and for social and cultural development and change. The working assumption is that the vitality of our common future is linked tightly to creative practice in many forms. This symposium will place artists, designers, architects and other active “creators” and those who teach in the creative disciplines squarely at the center of these important conversations along with leaders in industry and commerce who share an interest in the life of the imagination and its value to society.

Educators and other leaders in the arts, business, science, commerce, industry, public policy as well as other areas relevant to the symposium topics are invited to submit proposals to present research, works in progress, case studies, or summaries of research already completed that have the potential to stimulate lively and productive debates among symposium participants. Proposed presentations must include room for participant interaction so that the symposium sessions will be as interactive as possible.

A special feature of Claiming Creativity is the symposium online forum, which will be available beginning January 18, 2010 and will lead into the Chicago event. Successful proposal abstracts will be posted to the online forum for discussion by other symposium participants. These online discussions will provide additional ideas for special sessions at the symposium in Chicago designed specifically around the web forum discourse. Additionally, a symposium “journal” will be published through Columbia College Chicago’s academic press.
the workshops attached to it address Networked Realities / Receive and Respond:
Art paradigms exist on a continuum from the individual voice creating objects for contemplation to the engagement of groups in the performance of shared, responsive environments. This workshop tackles the notion of art as conversation, and considers the implications of interactivity on contemporary art practice.”
Further it addresses the topic of Unlikely Cohorts:

“How does Art compute Science? How does Science grapple with Art? Scientists and artists mediate the world with similar methodologies. They pursue inquiries with no preconceived answers. Research and artistic production lead both to creative analysis. As technologies thrive, more information is available for interpretation and scrutiny creating new arenas for scientists and artists to work collaboratively. This workshop will look at these areas of intersection to consider ideas of research, creativity, and new untraditional partnerships.”

What are your experiences in cross-disciplinary working and learning and how do you cope with working in between disciplines and learning cultures with students and pupils in formal and informal education settings? Looking forward to your comments.

For details about the symposium and the submission requirements please visit http://claimingcreativity.com

Networkingart Blog Launch

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

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Networkingart is a blog on activism, hacktivism and networking by Tatiana Bazzichelli, a.k.a. T_Bazz I came across in the context of hacking as an artistic strategy to be applied in media art education:

“It is the result and the evolution of an investigation in the field of hacktivism, networking and digital culture started in 1996 by Tatiana Bazzichelli, a.k.a. T_Bazz. Connecting hacker culture, experimental art and activism, Networkingart focuses on the activity of communities or individuals who create, act and write, exploring the unpredictable, the disruptive practice, the cultural ‘Trojan Horses’ – or better, social hacks – as a strategy for art. At the same time, it wants to reflect on the intersection between art and digital economy, focusing on the unpredictable as a business model, and a way to appropriate and creatively transform media and technology.

The art of networking embraces diverse practices and diverse media and technologies. And, most of all, diverse people. This blog is dedicated to them: to all the artists, hackers, free thinkers and open minds who
the author has had occasion to meet in the course of her investigation and those who will come next. It relates directly to the book ‘Networking. The Net as Artwork’ (Tatiana Bazzichelli, 2006; Eng. 2009), which describes the evolution of the Italian hacktivism and underground culture from the 1980s till today and which was an opportunity to share ideas, projects and strategies with hackers and activists from Italy and
Europe (mostly Middle and Northern Europe).

Networkingart starts in San Francisco, during a Visiting Scholarship of four months at Stanford University, in the context of a research about social networking, web 2.0 and art developed at Aarhus University, in
Denmark. Land of pranksters, artists and free thinkers, California is also land of exploration of new social and technological frontiers. This blog will evolve creating further connections and networks, both in the physical
and in the ‘virtual’ world.

Enjoy it!”

via the AHA list by T_Bazz

robot seals and androids

Friday, February 29th, 2008

PARO

Animated robots and androids of today are in development. Robotic systems and robotic toys have entered the nursery rooms. Paro, a Mental Commitment Robot , is a therapeutic robot seal designed by Takanori Shibata at the Intelligent System Research Institute in Japan by the state-run National Institute of Advanced Industries and Technology (AIST) beginning in 1993 “in an attempt to reduce cognitive disorders and rising long-term medial costs” (Loving the machine).
(For further reading on Paro see here:

In this context I came across the article entitled “warning of robots” (SZ, 27 Feb. 08 ) which fits nicely into my research. We discussed the issue in the seminar looking at the introduction of the androids developed by Hiroshi Ishigro at the Intelligent Robotics Laboratory at the University of Osaka. We discussed the interview with David Levy on his book “Love & Sex with Robots” looking at the question of androids and their impact on everyday life, addressing the issue of relationships between humans and robots and robots becoming partners people cohabit with.

However, watching the videos of the androids like receptionist Sara (who can express 6 emotions via facial expression and respond to questions or comments with “about seven hundred stock phrases in Japanese” (loving the machine) developed by Hiroshi Kobayashi, one gets a feel for how the future might look like – it is not only the Paros, Aibos and other robotic toys we will have to cope with, but the introduction of complex embodied conversational agents and identities.

Here are some of the videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MY8-sJS0W1I&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gD1tjTsBsJc&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g1SADcP5g1o&feature=related

(see here for the so called “Cute J-Girl Robot in Tokyo, Japan” and here for the AKIBA ROBOT FESTIVAL 2006 Actroid Female Robot

Clad actroid
Clad actroid via http://sjc.blog.uvm.edu

Hirishi ishigro#s android

Hiroshi Ishigro’s android via http://www.pinktentacle.com

RESEARCH INTO PRACTICE

Tuesday, February 12th, 2008

LOGO Research into Practice Conference 2008

In the context of the practice based PhD and linking research to practice I came over the following conference held in London:

The fifth biennial international Research into Practice will be held on 31 October 2008 at the Royal Society of Arts, London, and will explore the theme of “interpretation” in research in the visual and performing arts.
We are pleased to announce that one of our keynote speakers will be the eminent British art historian Griselda Pollock

ABSTRACTS ARE INVITED ON THE CONFERENCE THEME.

It is characteristic of research outputs, reports and theses in traditional disciplines that they are expressed in unambiguous language. One reason for this is to establish the grounds and argument from which the conclusions derive. Another reason is to be quite clear and explicit about what is being claimed as original by the author for the research. This characteristic has the effect of reinforcing the dominant knowledge models such as “the scientific method”, “empirical methods”, etc. However these models come from disciplines whose aims and objectives may differ from those in the arts and humanities. There has been much discussion about the suitability of such models for the visual and performing arts, which seem to rely on a more pluralistic approach to interpretation which values the fact that different generations and different cultures find their own value in the artefact.

Does this difference of explicitness between traditional disciplines and the arts mean that their research outputs cannot be compared? What is the status of the outcomes of research in the visual and performing arts in terms of what is known or discovered? Is research in these areas actually trying to achieve something quite different, and if so what? Is the value of research something constructed by the receiver, and if so what would that mean for knowledge-models in the arts? Are its outcomes more contingent than those in other disciplines because of this difference in the role of interpretation by the reader/viewer? Does the scientific method really result in unambiguous interpretation, or conversely is interpretation really so subjective in the arts?

The conference will focus on the theory of interpretation in research in traditional disciplines and on the emerging theory of interpretation in research in the visual and performing arts.
Conference topics that might be considered include, but are not restricted to:

* are unambiguous research outputs in the arts possible or desirable?
* are the problems of interpretation in the arts different from other disciplines?
* do the interpretational problems in arts stem from its media or from its aims?
* can anything be learned from studies in interpretation in other humanities subjects?
* in the historical past were issues of interpretation viewed differently?
* do the arts have special advantages that compensate for any perceived disadvantages with respect to interpretation of outcomes?
* how does the author/reader problem affect research?

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT THE CONFERENCE WEBSITE AT
http://www.herts.ac.uk/artdes1/research/res2prac/confhome.html
Research into Practice is the leading forum for scholarship on so-called practice-based research in the visual and performing arts, hosted biennially by the University of Hertfordshire, UK.

Contact r2p at herts.ac.uk

Via Drawing Research

The Centre for Research into Practice at the University of Hertfordshire explains the meaning of “research into practice” as follows:

“We are interested in the way in which practice advances knowledge. There has been a lot of discussion about this topic in the UK and internationally, in part caused by the growth of art and design in the university sector and the expectation of, and evaluation in terms of, research outputs. Many other disciplines are led by advances in practice, indeed it has been argued that all research is practice-based. However, there seems to be a group of disciplines in which the practitioner holds a particular role and in which the theorist may be viewed as some sort of onlooker or critic. Those disciplines are as diverse as art, therapies and law. The fact that these disciplines are advanced by practice does not mean that they are not advanced by theory. There are theories of art, theories of therapy and theories of law. But the practitioner is somehow the key professional, the key person who advances the discipline. So what is the relationship between these different roles, and what do these disciplines have in common that might form a theory of research? This is research into practice. Of course, in such disciplines it is no surprise to find that it also means to put research into practice, i.e. to evaluate its outcomes in terms of its application to practice. ” (source: http://sitem.herts.ac.uk/artdes_research/cr2p/mean.htm)

practice based PhD

Tuesday, February 12th, 2008

“To Phd or not to Phd ? : How to improve research based art practice” was initiated by the Leonardo Education Forum.
In Germany, the practice based PhD is rather not an issue discussed yet. This might be to do with the high status of the traditional PhD, the Dr. phil. in Germany, as discussed on the re:place meeting “At the crossroads of Media Art, Technology and Education supported by LEF. However, here is the information I want to share with you:

“Respondents will include: Ken Friedman, Kristina Niedderer, Deirdre Barron, John Zimmerman, Basak Senova. All interested persons are invited to participate.

Like scientists, artists are engaged in research activities. However research is carried out in different ways when comparing artists to scientists. During the last 20 years, a number of academic institutions have created PhDs in Art as well as a Practice Based Research Degrees. For a thorough report on this question, please refer to the one written by Professor Stuart Lain, University of Brighton (http://www.it.bton.ac.uk/research/euindia/knowledgebase/
brightonpg/laing.htm).

We would like to invite Yasminers to discuss the broader question of how research education in art should be designed today. Respodents will include:

Dr.Ken Friedman, PhD in Design Norwegian School of Management

Dr. Kristina Niedderer. Silversmith and designer as well as an expert on the relation between arts practice and research training. Her current research focuses on experiential knowledge.

Dr. Deirdre Barron from Swinburne University research coordinator at Swinburne University Faculty of Design. She is currently writing a book on doctoral education in design, and together with her research group, she is doing a massive review of the literature to date.

Dr.John Zimmerman, School of Design Carnegie Mellon University

Dr. Basak Senova, School of Communication, Kadir Has University
This discussion is part of the program of the Leonardo Education Forum in cooperation with the YASMIN Network. Further information on the Leonardo Eduation Forum (open to educators and students) is available at: http://artsci.ucla.edu/LEF/

Forthcoming: Dates : 3rd March 2008 14th March 2008

via Yasmin/Roger Malina